WorldIn Rome, G20 puts Mario Draghi's international leadership to the test

In Rome, G20 puts Mario Draghi’s international leadership to the test



Mario Draghi came to the presidency of the Italian Council of Ministers in February 2021. The real time, marked by the calendar, is nine months. But the political sensation, the measure of the amount of change this has brought about, is much greater. The Union Government headed by Draghi has implemented important reforms in the Justice, Treasury and Public Administration. It corrected the vaccination campaign, gave stability to the country and managed to bring ideologically opposed parties together on issues such as pensions. In Italy, stability is ephemeral. But Draghi has so far been building an image of an international leader just as Chancellor Angela Merkel is stepping down as Germany’s head of government and President Emmanuel Macron is more concerned about France’s domestic issues than European affairs . The G20 summit, which begins this Saturday in Rome, is the grand debut of its international leadership.

Palazzo Chigi, seat of the Italian Executive, directly participated in the organization of an event that paralyzes the center of Rome from this Friday afternoon. The interest in everything coming out perfectly is very high. But the meeting starts off somewhat lackluster due to the absence of Russian President Vladimir Putin and Chinese President Xi Jinping. Another objective of the Italian turnaround presidency is for members of this club to commit to zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, at a meeting that will precede the 26th United Nations Conference on Climate Change (COP26), which starts on Monday. fair in Glasgow. There is fear that the absences mentioned, added to that of the Japanese president, Fumio Kishida, due to the elections in his country, and that of the Mexican president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, prevent any relevant agreement from being reached on this issue.

Draghi will use the G20 meeting to hold bilateral meetings with key international leaders. This Friday, he received US President Joe Biden, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and UN Secretary General António Guterres. But Biden, with permission from Draghi, former president of the European Central Bank, will be the main protagonist of the summit. The American arrived in Rome to certify his country’s return to multilateralism, after four years of isolation under Donald Trump’s Administration. The American leader’s agenda for this Friday included the Pope, Prime Minister Draghi and Italian President Sergio Mattarella.

The meeting with Macron will be the one with the greatest political content, given the diplomatic crisis caused by the termination of the contract for the sale of submarines to Australia and by the defense pact in the Indo-Pacific, sealed without the participation of Paris. “Following the announcement of the Aukus association, the two presidents spoke by telephone on September 22 and agreed to initiate high-level consultations with the aim of restoring confidence and reactivating the Franco-American relationship based on common goals. They also agreed to meet at the end of October”, indicated the Élysée Palace in a statement.

Rome also wants there to be no security problems and that the only images highlighted internationally are those of a successful summit. Therefore, it shielded the city with 5,000 police officers who will protect the precinct where the meeting will be held, in the EUR neighborhood —an area built during the regime of Benito Mussolini, who intended to hold the Universal Exhibition of 1942 there—, and the points of the city where demonstrations must take place. Environmental activists, workers and the usual anti-vaccines are expected to take to the streets. The police operation provides for the blockade of traffic in the city center to avoid problems.

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